Denmark

Bicycle business rides into town

A TWO-WHEEL tour-de-force for Denmark’s economy is set to roll out from a heritage listed shop-front beside the Raven Coffee shop.

Mountain biker Nathan Devenport says his Monkey Rock Mountain Bike Company will bring new life to 28 Hollings Road, vacant for some years after having once been a gallery and before that a Mexican restaurant.

“The company will be a multi-faceted mountain bike business that does tours and rentals,” he says.

“The tour will be with a lunch, say out to a nice Denmark beach, then a bit of a chill.

“We can have people come back after the tours and have a coffee and cake next door at Ravens.”

Nathan Devenport with his Norco mountain bike at his soon-to-be shop-front. Photo: Chris Thomson

Devenport, who is heavily involved in the Denmark Mountain Bike Club, says the second plank in his business plan is trails development and consultation.

“That involves building trail networks, bike paths, pump tracks for schools,” he explains.

“Or someone might want a pump track in their backyard for their kids rather than a trampoline or a cubby house – we can construct all that sort of stuff.” 

Devenport says that if the track construction takes off, government contracts would not be out of the question.

“Through this, working with local diggers and plumbers, we would upskill them, and create a little bit more of an industry in Denmark,” he says.

“Young kids and teenagers coming through, that want to do that kind of thing for a job, we’ll be able to offer that sort of stuff so there’s choice for kids in our community.

“You’ve only got to look at how many carpenters we’ve got in town; our market can only sustain so much.”

Devenport, a Gyprocker by trade, says that the third facet of his business will be education. 

“We’re looking to run programs for schools so that we could take on a contract next year to go into a school with a dozen or so bikes and run a little bike-ed course for them, you know your basic bike stuff; stopping, braking, where your feet should be on the pedals, all this sort of caper, how to go around a corner safely,” he says.

The company’s logo features a pretty mean looking simian that bears a strong resemblance to its namesake rock.

“We run the Monkey Rock Mountain Bike Race down there and I live just at the base of Mount Hallowell,” Devenport says.

“That’s quite a special place for me.

“That’s where I’ve been riding for at least 10 years now.”

He has engaged Denmark suppliers to take promotional photographs and build a website.

“We’re trying to engage all of Denmark,” he says.

“With the tours, I’d like to have different sectors of Denmark complement that, say by providing a nice bottle of wine that we can endorse, nice cheeses and have a beautiful platter for the riders and say: ‘Hey, we got this from the cheese factory in Denmark’, so we can push all of that back to local business.”

Devenport lodged an application about a month ago to modify the shopfront, which is on the Shire’s heritage list. To that end, a Mount Hallowell home-owner gave him a slab of she-oak from their block that he plans to turn into a sign to hang outside.

He says he hopes the Monkey Rock Mountain Bike Company will open in time for the September school holidays.

He won’t be in town for Easter though, preferring to compete in the Expert Men division of the state mountain bike series at Yarloop.

“I’m old enough for the Masters now, but I still like to give the young guys a bit of a razz-up,” he smiles.

Categories: Denmark, SPORT

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